You made Colorado kids a priority in your vote this election – here’s how to keep speaking up

Written by: Jacy Montoya Price
Date Posted: November 6, 2020

Your hard work and engagement helped to score significant wins for Colorado kids and their families in the 2020 election! Thank you to each person who took action. Whether you voted, reached out to friends and family, posted on social media, text or phone banked, wrote postcards, dropped literature, took care of kids so others could volunteer, or took other advocacy actions – YOU made a difference. We hope you take some time to celebrate, rest, and rejuvenate before jumping back into action.

We also hope that you’ll continue speaking up this year and into 2021 as we work together to ensure that every child in Colorado has every chance to succeed. Some activities you might consider include:

  • Post at least one fact about the health and wellbeing of children and families on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. Tag your state legislators in the post and include #coleg and other hashtags like #eceCO #cokids #childhealth or #@edcolo. For Colorado specific data, visit http://datacenter.kidscount.org/data#CO/2/0 or use Fast Facts from past KidsFlash editions.
  • Call, email or write a letter to your legislators at least once before the beginning of the 2021 legislative session in January to remind them to make children and their families a priority. You can identify your legislators and their contact information on the Colorado General Assembly’s website .
  • Write a letter to the editor of your local paper about an issue impacting kids and their families in your community. Use content from our Campaign for Kids materials and  KIDS COUNT to help draft your letter.
  • Attend a (virtual) town hall meeting and ask a question related to the issues you care about. You can figure out when your legislators and others are holding events and meetings by joining their mailing lists and/or following them on social media.
  • Join a local task force or council on child mental health, early childhood learning and development, family support, affordable housing, education, or another topic that impacts child health and well-being. Local government has a large impact on the health and well-being of children and families. Consider attending a local city council or county commissioner meeting to stay informed.
  • Make a donation to support the Colorado Children’s Campaign’s  nonpartisan, research-based advocacy and policy work.
  • Host a house party and invite an expert to help your friends and family learn more about children’s issues.
  • Consider hosting a listening session to help inform the reimagination of preschool as a universal program in Colorado, an effort made possible by revenue generated through Proposition EE.
  • Take some time to rest, relax, and rejuvenate – Colorado kids need your advocacy over the long term!  Check out these tips from Living Proof Advocacy, ZERO TO THREEA Voice for the Innocentand New Tactics in Human Rights 
  • Mark your calendar for the start of the 2021 legislative session, which is currently scheduled for Wednesday, January 13.
Jacy Montoya Price

About Jacy Montoya Price

Jacy serves as the Advocacy Director for the Colorado Children’s Campaign. In this role, she oversees the development, implementation and evaluation of the Children’s Campaign’s efforts to engage advocates, providers, parents, caregivers and others in our policy work, publications and research. She also co-convenes the Raise Colorado coalition, which works to ensure that pregnant people, infants, toddlers, and their families have what they need to thrive. Jacy previously served as the executive director and co-founder of Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights (COLOR), a sisterhood of Latinas dedicated to building a movement of Latinas, their families, and allies through leadership development, organizing, and advocacy to create opportunity and achieve reproductive justice. A Colorado native, Jacy lives in East Denver with her husband and two children who can often be found “glamping” across Colorado in their 1976 Airstream camper.