HB18-1004 (Coleman & Wilson/Tate & Kefalas) Renewing the Child Care Contribution Credit

Originally Posted: January 19, 2018
Last Updated: May 11, 2018

Summary

This bill would continue a credit that allows individuals and businesses to make contributions to promote child care in Colorado and claim a credit for up to 50 percent of the contribution.

Position

The Children’s Campaign strongly supports this bill because this credit is critical to providing quality child care options for children across Colorado, and in particular kids in families facing the most barriers to economic security. The Child Care Contribution Tax Credit (CCTC) was created in 1998 and is available to taxpayers who contribute to child care, foster care, youth shelters, residential treatment centers, before and after-school programming, and grant programs to help families afford child care outside of school hours. More than 6,000 organizations in communities throughout Colorado can receive contributions that are eligible for the CCTC. Child care and youth programs help ensure children have quality, enriching experiences while at the same time allowing parents to work. Investing in the network of providers that support children outside of school time means supporting two generations (parent and child) at once. See our fact sheet for the broad list of supporters endorsing this bill.

Current Status

Passed the Senate with a strong bipartisan 28-6 vote and now heads to the governor for signature

Previous Statuses


January 19, 2018

Assigned to the House Finance Committee, where it will be heard on Monday, Jan. 29 at 1:30 p.m. in LSB-A.

January 19, 2018

Assigned to the House Finance Committee, where it will be heard on Monday, Jan. 29 at 1:30 p.m. in LSB-A. Bill Jaeger, Vice President of Early Childhood Initiatives, will testify in support.

April 20, 2018

Passed the House Appropriations Committee on a bipartisan vote of 9-4 and passed on the House floor this morning on a bipartisan vote of 39 to 22 (with 4 excused) and now heads to the Senate.

April 27, 2018

Passed the Senate Finance Committee on a bipartisan vote of 4-1 and now heads to the Appropriations Committee