In the News

As a trusted source of expertise and data about children in Colorado, the Colorado Children’s Campaign is frequently cited in news stories statewide, increasing the visibility of issues affecting the health, education, and wellbeing of children in Colorado. Please read through the following articles to learn more about important issues affecting Colorado children.

Colorado voters will decide on $1.6 billion tax increase for education

Colorado voters will decide on $1.6 billion tax increase for education

Chalkbeat |  August 14, 2018

In contrast, the Colorado Children’s Campaign quickly issued a statement in support of the measure, calling it a “once-in-a-generation opportunity to create an education financing system that is more adequate, modern, equitable, and sustainable. This is the first step in removing structural barriers to opportunity and ensuring every chance for every child to succeed.”

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Hickenlooper calls for investigation into Trump immigration policy

Hickenlooper calls for investigation into Trump immigration policy

Colorado Politics |  July 3, 2018

Hickenlooper’s office alerted the press to the letter that also was endorsed by the Colorado Children’s Campaign, Colorado Psychiatric Society, the Colorado chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Colorado Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Society, the Colorado Psychological Association, the Colorado chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, the National Foundation to end Child Abuse and Neglect, and the Children’s Hospital Colorado.

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Free school lunch expansion bill heads to governor’s desk

Free school lunch expansion bill heads to governor’s desk

K-12 Daily |  May 9, 2018

Currently, school lunches are provided at no charge to students in grades pre-K-5 who would otherwise have to pay for reduced-price lunch. According to Leslie Colwell, vice president of education initiatives for the Colorado Children’s Campaign, a non-profit, advocacy groups that works to improve child well-being in health, education and early childhood, some districts have seen a drop of about 20 percent in school lunch participation between grades five and six–something they attribute in large part to the cost of the reduced-price meal.

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